Useful websites

 

Jargon buster

 

Radiology (Xray)

Interventional Radiology

Contact: Freeman Hospital: (0191) 223 1012; RVI: (0191) 282 5627

This section will provide detailed information regarding the interventional radiology procedures we provide at either the Freeman Hospital or the Royal Victoria Infimary:

  • Angiogram - a way of showing up blood vessels on a special X-ray machine. Using a fluid called ‘contrast medium’ to outline the insides of the vessels, a picture is produced, which is rather like a road map of the arteries or veins.
  • Angioplasty and Stents - An Angioplasty is a way of re-opening a blocked artery by inserting a fine plastic tube, called a catheter, through the blockage and inflating a small balloon on the catheter.
  • Arthrogram & Joint Injection -‘Arthrogram’ means picture of a joint following an injection of a contrast medium. An Arthrogram may be performed to obtain information about the joint or when an injection of medication is required into a joint.
  • Carotid Angiogram - A Carotid Angiogram is a way of showing up blood vessels in the neck and head on a special X-ray machine. Using a fluid called ‘contrast medium’ to outline the insides of the vessels, a picture is produced, which is rather like a road map of the arteries.
  • Liver Biopsy - This is where a needle is used to take a small piece of your liver. The sample will be looked at under a microscope and will help your doctors to diagnose and treat your condition. (See Transjugular Liver Biopsy also).
  • Lung Biopsy - A lung biopsy is a way of obtaining cells from the lungs, so that they can be looked at under the microscope.
  • Percutaneous Biliary Drainage and Stent - You have what is called “obstructive jaundice” which is usually caused by a blockage in the bile duct between the liver and the duodenum. In order to relieve the blockage, a tube is inserted through the skin and into the liver to drain the bile. The drainage tube takes bile fluid from the liver into a collecting bag outside the body.
  • Percutaneous Nephrostomy - The tubes draining your kidneys sometimes become blocked, for example, by a stone or a blood clot and infection may be present. This is a procedure to insert a catheter through the skin and into the kidney in order to drain it. The catheter drains the kidney into a collecting bag outside the body.
  • Transjugular Liver Biopsy - Most people have a biopsy taken by a needle passed directly through the skin into the liver. Some people, however, have abnormal blood clotting or have fluid around their liver. For these people it is safer to pass the needle from a vein in the neck (the jugular vein) to the inside of the liver. This way a hole is not made on the outside of the liver and the rare risk of serious bleeding is made even less likely. (See Liver Biopsy also).
  • Vena Cava Filter - A Vena Cava Filter is a small, metal device about an inch long, shaped rather like the spokes of an umbrella. The filter is placed in the Vena Cava, which is the large vein in the abdomen that brings blood back from the legs and pelvis, towards the heart. If there are blood clots in the veins in the legs or pelvis, these could pass up the Vena Cava and into the lungs and cause severe illness or even death. The filter will trap these blood clots and prevent them entering the lungs and causing problems.

© Copyright Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 2017 Site by TH_NK